Hudson & Landry

Hudson & Landry were a very underrated American comedy team who wrote and recorded four gold albums in the 1970s: Hanging In There (1971), Losing Their Heads (1972), Right-Off! (1972), and The Weird Kingdom (1974). Their “Ajax Liquor Store” sketch from 1971 is a comedy classic and was nominated for a Grammy Award.

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Silver Jubilee

The 1977 Silver Jubilee of Elizabeth II was a celebration of the 25th anniversary of Queen Elizabeth II’s accession to the throne. It featured large-scale parties and parades throughout the United Kingdom and the Commonwealth throughout the year, peaking in June with “Jubilee Days,” coinciding with the Queen’s official birthday.

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REMEMBER DUANE ALLMAN

Duane Allman, guitarist for the Allman Brothers Band, died October 29, 1971, from injuries in a motorcycle accident on Hillcrest Avenue in Macon, Georgia. In 1973, four fans carved a seven foot high “REMEMBER DUANE ALLMAN” in a dirt embankment along Interstate Highway 20 near Vicksburg, Mississippi. It remained visible for ten years.

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Space Fidgit

The Space Fidgit was an interesting 70’s toy that consisted of a colored, creamy gel-like liquid encased in a transparent plastic half-bubble. When the user slid their fingers over the flat back of the bubble, the movement and body heat would generate a kind of morphing liquid light show.

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Kolchak: The Night Stalker

Kolchak: The Night Stalker is an American television series that aired on ABC during the 1974–1975 season. It starred Darren McGavin as Chicago newspaper reporter Carl Kolchak, who investigated mysterious crimes which the local police normally chose not to follow up on. The cases usually entailed supernatural or science-fiction elements.

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Taylor Camp

In 1969 Howard Taylor, brother of Elizabeth, bailed out a motley group of thirteen young Hawaiians jailed for vagrancy and invited them to camp on his ocean front land. It wasn’t long before word spread and scores of hippies, surfers and troubled Vietnam vets migrated to Taylor Camp and built a clothing-optional, pot-hazed treehouse village at the end of a road on Kauai’s North Shore.

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Canada’s Largest Art Theft

Canada’s largest art theft occurred on Labor Day in 1972 when three armed bandits broke into the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts through a skylight under repair and stole 18 paintings and 37 objects of decorative arts and jewellery. All but one of the stolen paintings – a small Jan Breughel painting – remain missing today.

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Left Coast 70s

SomaFM is an independent internet-only streaming group of radio channels, supported entirely with donations from listeners. They’ve recently introduced the new channel, “Left Coast 70s”, which they define as “Mellow album rock from the Seventies. Yacht friendly.”

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Love Canal

Love Canal is an aborted canal project branching off of the Niagara River about four miles south of Niagara Falls, NY. It is also the name of a fifteen-acre, neighborhood built directly adjacent to the canal. From 1942 to 1953, the Hooker Chemical Company, with government sanction, began using the partially dug canal as a chemical waste dump. At the end of this period, the canal contained approx 21,000 tons of toxic chemicals, including at least twelve that are known carcinogens. Hooker covered the 16-acre hazardous waste landfill in clay and sold the land to the Niagara Falls School Board, attempting to absolve itself of any future liability by including a warning in the property deed.

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Ripping Yarns

Created by Michael Palin and Terry Jones following the end of Monty Python’s Flying Circus, Ripping Yarns was a British television series featuring tales of adventure, mystery, suspense and drama – a BBC production that ran for two seasons. Each episode had a different setting and characters, all focused on a different aspect of British culture and parodying pre-World War II literature aimed at schoolboys.

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Christgau’s Record Guide: Rock Albums of the Seventies

One of the earliest professional rock critics, Robert Christgau is known for his terse reviews, published from 1969 to 2013 in his Consumer Guide columns. He also spent 37 years as music editor for The Village Voice, during which time he created the annual Pazz & Jop poll.

His book, “Christgau’s Record Guide: Rock Albums of the Seventies” was published in 1981 and contains a multitude of his brief and often sarcastic reviews of 70’s era albums.

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